What Are Personal Data Categories?

What are the 7 principles of GDPR?

The GDPR sets out seven key principles:Lawfulness, fairness and transparency.Purpose limitation.Data minimisation.Accuracy.Storage limitation.Integrity and confidentiality (security)Accountability..

What information can I request under GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), under Article 15, gives individuals the right to request a copy of any of their personal data which are being ‘processed’ (i.e. used in any way) by ‘controllers’ (i.e. those who decide how and why data are processed), as well as other relevant information (as detailed …

What are the two types of personal data?

Are there categories of personal data?race;ethnic origin;political opinions;religious or philosophical beliefs;trade union membership;genetic data;biometric data (where this is used for identification purposes);health data;More items…

What is a category of data?

information–A compilation of data provided by protected or open sources that would provide a substantially complete picture of friendly intentions, capabilities, or activities. …

What is protected personal information?

Personal Identifiable Information (PII) is defined as: Any representation of information that permits the identity of an individual to whom the information applies to be reasonably inferred by either direct or indirect means. … It is the responsibility of the individual user to protect data to which they have access.

What are the four types of personal information?

The following are common types of personal information.Name. A person’s name.Identification. Government issued id numbers such as a passport number or vehicle license plate.Address. Physical address and digital addresses such as an IP address.Contact. … Biographical. … Technical. … Biological Identifiers. … Medical.More items…•

What are the categories of data subjects?

Most common categories of data subjectsEmployees.Suppliers.Customers.Job applicants.Consultants.Visitors.Prospects.Contractors.More items…•

What is considered personal data?

Personal data are any information which are related to an identified or identifiable natural person. … For example, the telephone, credit card or personnel number of a person, account data, number plate, appearance, customer number or address are all personal data.

What is not personal information?

Non-personally identifiable information (non-PII) is data that cannot be used on its own to trace, or identify a person. Examples of non-PII include, but are not limited to: Aggregated statistics on the use of product / service.

What is Data Protection Act in simple words?

The Data Protection Act (DPA) protects the privacy and integrity of data held on individuals by businesses and other organisations. The act ensures that individuals (customers and employees) have access to their data and can correct it, if necessary.

What is the importance of data privacy act?

Why is the Data Protection Act important? The Data Protection Act is important because it provides guidance and best practice rules for organisations and the government to follow on how to use personal data including: Regulating the processing of personal data. Protecting the rights of the data subject.

What is not personal data?

Personal data is information that relates to an identified or identifiable individual. … Even if an individual is identified or identifiable, directly or indirectly, from the data you are processing, it is not personal data unless it ‘relates to’ the individual.

Is name and address sensitive data?

“By itself the name John Smith may not always be personal data because there are many individuals with that name. However, where the name is combined with other information (such as an address, a place of work, or a telephone number) this will usually be sufficient to clearly identify one individual.”

Are emails personal data under GDPR?

The simple answer is that individuals’ work email addresses are personal data. If you are able to identify an individual either directly or indirectly (even in a professional capacity), then GDPR will apply. A person’s individual work email typically includes their first/last name and where they work.

What are the types of personal information?

Examples of personal information a person’s name, address, phone number or email address. … a person’s medical details or health information. a person’s fingerprints or blood type. details about a person’s religious or sexual preferences.

What are the examples of sensitive personal information?

trade-union membership; genetic data, biometric data processed solely to identify a human being; health-related data; data concerning a person’s sex life or sexual orientation.

Can personal data be shared without permission?

No. Organisations don’t always need your consent to use your personal data. They can use it without consent if they have a valid reason. These reasons are known in the law as a ‘lawful basis’, and there are six lawful bases organisations can use.